WARNING

You are using an outdated browser. Please upgrade your browser to improve your experience.

Close [x]

Canine Vaccines

DHPP – This stands for distemper, hepatitis, parvo, and parainfluenza. These are all highly infectious diseases that can be fatal to your pet if they contract them. We vaccinate for this yearly throughout your pet’s life and they are all included in one injection. Read further for explanation of each of these diseases.

Distemper - Distemper is one of the two most important diseases of dogs. It is very widespread, and nearly every dog will be exposed to distemper within the first year of life in our area.  Signs include coughing, vomiting, diarrhea, and loss of appetite, fever, and discharges from the eyes and/or nose. “Squinting” of the eyes is often the first sign observed. Once the virus enters the nervous system, convulsions, twitches, or partial paralysis become evident. It is spread through all body secretions and is highly contagious. It is usually fatal.

Parvo - Since its devastating worldwide appearance in 1978, most dog owners have heard of parvo. It is transmitted through direct contact with an infected dog’s feces. A dog that recovers from the disease remains a “carrier” spreading the virus in its bowel movements for 1‑3 months. Signs include vomiting, fever, depression, and diarrhea, which often will contain large amounts of blood. There is another form where the virus attacks the heart muscle causing a heart attack and death. The younger the pet, the GREATER the chance of death. The death rate is very high in dogs under 4‑6 months of age. Dogs remain susceptible to Parvovirus infection until two WEEKS AFTER THE LAST INJECTION in the vaccination series. This is the MOST SERIOUS and FATAL disease we see today.

Canine Infectious Hepatitis - Canine hepatitis affects the dog’s liver. Spread through an infected dog’s urine, exposure can mean anything from a mild infection to death. Puppies are at the most risk with this disease. Vaccination has controlled this disease for several years, making it rarely seen by the veterinarian today.

Corona Virus - Corona virus is an intestinal infection resulting in diarrhea, vomiting, and depression. It is HIGHLY CONTAGIOUS and can be FATAL. Research shows it often co‑exists with “Parvo” at the same time in many dogs.

Rabies – This vaccination is required by law and is not optional. Rabies is a FATAL INFECTION of the nervous system that attacks all warm‑blooded animals, including humans. Rabies has become synonymous with the image of a vicious dog. Rabies is a public health hazard and a personal risk to all pet owners. Rabies can be transmitted through the bite of an infected animal. Even dogs kept indoors can come in contact with a rabies carrier in a basement, garage, or attic. Because there is no cure for rabies, vaccination is your pet’s only protection

Bordetella – This is to protect against ‘kennel cough’. Technically known as “tracheobronchitis,” it is an upper respiratory infection with the major sign being a persistent, dry, hacking cough. It often lasts several weeks and is HIGHLY CONTAGIOUS. It is caused by several viruses and bacteria, which are included in the vaccinations.   It is recommended if your dog spends time at the dog park, the kennel, or socializes with other dogs. A dog can be infected with kennel cough and be contagious for up to 2 weeks before showing any signs or symptoms.

Lepto – Leptospirosis is a bacterial infection that your pet can contract from drinking water or licking grass that is contaminated with infected wildlife urine. We recommend this if your pet spends a lof of time outdoors, hiking, or at the cottage.  It can reside as a low‑level infection for months or years, infecting other dogs while weakening your pet. This can be transmitted to humans and can cause kidney damage so we especially recommend it if you have children in the household.

Lyme – Lyme disease is transmitted through ticks. We recommend this if your pet spends time outdoors or in long grass. Lyme disease can be transmitted to humans and is a very serious infection. It can be very difficult to diagnose and to treat. We recommend checking your dog for ticks if they have spent time outdoors in long grass. Don’t forget to check between their toes!

Parainfluenza - Canine parainfluenza virus (CPIV) is a highly contagious respiratory virus and is one of the most common pathogens of infectious tracheobronchitis, also known as canine cough. Although the respiratory signs may resemble those of canine influenza, they are an unrelated viruses and require different vaccines for protection.


Feline Vaccines

FVRCP – ‘FVR’ stands for ‘Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis’
                 ‘C’ stands for ‘Calicivirus’
                 ‘P’ stands for ‘Panleukopenia’

Feline Rhinotracheitis - Rhinotracheitis is a severe upper respiratory infection caused by a feline type 1, herpes-virus. It is most severe in young kittens and older cats, and is one of the most serious upper respiratory diseases seen in the feline species. The virus is airborne and very contagious in susceptible animals.

Cats with this infection are lethargic, and show signs of respiratory involvement with much sneezing and coughing. There is usually a discharge from the nostrils and the eyes, and a high temperature may be present. Some cats develop pneumonia and occasionally ulcerations in the eyes. Infested cats do not want to eat or drink because the nostrils are plugged and the throat is sore. Dehydration and weight loss are common.

The disease is debilitating and chronic. Many cats require hospitalization, intravenous fluids and intensive care to help them get over the infection. Antibiotics are given to treat secondary bacterial infections. Some cats suffer permanent damage to the eyes and the respiratory system. Fortunately, the vaccine is an effective preventive agent.

Calicivirus - There are several strains of caliciviruses that affect the cat. They can cause a range of diseases, from a mild almost asymptomatic infection, to life-threatening pneumonia. Most cases show only evidence of problems in the mouth, nasal passages and the conjunctiva (mucus membranes) of the eyes.

Early signs are loss of appetite, elevated temperature and lethargy. Later, sneezing, oral ulcers and discharge from the eyes are seen. The course of the disease in uncomplicated cases is short, and recovery may be expected in seven to ten days. Some of the more virulent strains can cause severe symptoms. They may cause rapid death in young kittens and older cats.

The disease is transmitted by direct contact with an infected cat or object (bowl, cage, brush, blanket, etc.) that harbors the virus. The virus can survive eight to ten days in the environment. Carrier cats can pass the virus into the environment for up to one year.

Panleukopenia - Panleukopenia (also known as feline distemper and infectious feline enteritis) is a highly contagious disease characterized by a short course and high mortality rate. The disease is caused by a parvovirus similar to the parvovirus seen in dogs. It is very resistant and may remain infectious in the environment for up to a year.

The disease is most severe in young kittens, but can affect cats of all ages. The first symptom is loss of appetite, followed by vomiting and diarrhea. A blood count usually shows a lowered number of white blood cells, a fact which helps in diagnosing the infection.

Infected cats usually must be hospitalized with intensive treatment such as intravenous fluids, antibiotic and supportive care. Mortality rate may reach 90% in young kittens under six months, and may approach 50% in older animals. The vaccine is very effective in preventing the disease.

Rabies – This vaccination is required by law and is not optional. Rabies is a FATAL INFECTION of the nervous system that attacks all warm‑blooded animals, including humans. Rabies has become synonymous with the image of a vicious dog. Rabies is a public health hazard and a personal risk to all pet owners. Rabies can be transmitted through the bite of an infected animal. Even dogs kept indoors can come in contact with a rabies carrier in a basement, garage, or attic. Because there is no cure for rabies, vaccination is your pet’s only protection

Feline Leukemia – Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) is a retrovirus that infects cats. FeLV can be transmitted from infected cats when the transfer of saliva or nasal secretions is involved. If not defeated by the animal’s immune system, the virus can cause diseases which can be lethal. One disease caused by this virus is a form of cancer of the blood cells called lymphocytes (a leukemia).

Symptoms include loss of appetitie, poor coat condition, uneven pupils, chronic infections, oral disease, seizures, fever, weight loss, diarrhea, anemia and jaundice (yellowing of the skin due to liver failure). Some cats can be carriers and not show any symptoms.

We recommend this vaccine to any cats that will be going outdoors.

UA-49414425-1